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Lix COO Shares How He Tackled the Publishing Industry - 3 min read

Hi, my name is Kasper Krog. I’m the co-founder and COO of Lix and I would like to share my story with you.

Yep, that’s me!

Even without a university degree, I guess some would say that I’ve been pretty successful (or maybe lucky). Just five years ago, I was Vice President of Netbooster (now Artefact), one of the largest digital agencies in Europe. At the same time, I was a passive investor in a few startups. But my priorities soon changed—my son was born and my job at Netbooster was really stressful. So I sat down with my wife and we both agreed that I should STOP all that ‘investing nonsense’. Shortly after, I sold my equity in the two startups and focused on my family (and my full-time job). But I just couldn’t kick the ‘investment itch’.

Then I Met Camilla

Within a few months of ‘not investing,’ I got a bit bored. Then I met Camilla. Sometimes, if you’re lucky, you meet people with a special aura surrounding them. That’s Camilla in a nutshell. I saw such great potential in her. While she was busy rattling on about the “Spotify of textbooks,” I was already sold on her—not her great idea of Lix, just her—so I invested.

Just hanging out with Camilla.

Six months later—I was in love. Not with Camilla—I’m happily married. But I fell in love with our shared vision of Lix—transforming the way students learn worldwide. So I quit my fancy job and joined Camilla at Lix. And to this day, I couldn’t ask for a better business partner. If I could choose anyone to work with, I would still choose Camilla.

“Six months later—I was in love. Not with Camilla—I’m happily married. But I fell in love with our shared vision of Lix—transforming the way students learn worldwide.”

And Then Came the Publishers…Oh Boy!

Let’s just say it hasn’t been easy. When I left Netbooster to join Lix full-time, I really thought it would be a piece of cake to convince publishers to sell their textbooks on the Lix platform. I mean, it was 2015 at the time—everything was digital.

Boy, was I wrong! All I received was one “no” after another. Literally, no one wanted to work with us.

After my first 14 days at Lix, I’d have to give myself a pep talk every single morning. And six months after that, I was still listening to the same motivational speech while driving to work. Looking back, I simply didn’t get it. The entire publishing industry was still stuck in the ’90s. They weren’t driven by technology nor digitization. Selling physical books was their end game and a game they were very good at.

It literally took hundreds of dialogues with publishers before we eventually got a “yes.” Local publishers wouldn’t work with us. They thought we were too disruptive and were out to kill all physical textbooks. So we shifted our focus to large, international publishers. We were lucky enough to have a great mentor at Sage who made the digital transition with us.

“It literally took hundreds of dialogues with publishers before we eventually got a “yes.”

Shortly after we got Sage onboard, our platform was validated—other publishers were more willing to listen—publishers like Wiley and Cengage.

Fast-forward to 2019, Lix now works with over 17,000 publishers and carries nearly 1 million books on our platform.

Final Thoughts

We’re really proud of what we’ve built at Lix, but we’ll never stop evolving. In 10 years, I hope that every student in higher education will have access to world-class content empowered by amazing technology, or at least have the choice to personalize the way they learn. Because no one learns the same.


Kasper is referred to as a war pilot of the publishing world—overseeing all Lix publishing partnerships, the overall strategy and the execution plan. His vision for Lix is to change the way students learn, granting them access to collaborate freely and consume accessible content, all while on the Lix platform. And thanks to Kasper’s efforts, Lix now works with over 17,000 publishers and carries nearly 1 million textbooks.

Kristy is a copywriter and former student at Columbia University. Having lived in New York City, Berlin and Auckland, she's a bit of a nomad, but has found a home away from home (wherever that is) in Copenhagen. When she's not busy writing on everything 'study-related,' she can be found in vintage shops and coffee parlors all around Copenhagen.

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