fbpx

A Brand New Note-Taking Tool to Help You Organize Your Studies - 3 min read

Struggling to take notes during class? Researching and taking notes can quickly turn into a cluttered mess. Traditional note-taking (AKA: handwritten notes) easily results in a disorganized heap of papers. But you no longer have to stress about that! Lix’s brand new feature, Notes, is designed to bring order to the chaos.

Why should I take notes with Lix?

We get it—most students use OneNote or Evernote to take notes. And there’s no question—these are both good note-taking apps. But here’s some ways that Lix’s Notes differ:

  1. Our notes are made specifically for students. We’re not trying to target your mom’s recipe collection or organize your shopping lists—we ONLY care about you and your studies.
  2. We’ve kept it simple. We didn’t add a bunch of weird functionality that you’ll never end up using. Our notes are clutter-free and easy to use.
  3. It’s easy to get distracted, so we’ve made sure your books and notes are the only things you’ll need to focus on.  

Here’s How it Works

In your Lix app, you can find a full-fledged note editor that allows you to take free-form notes and keep them neatly organized in notebooks. While you can structure your notes any way you want, here’s our recommendation: 

Let’s say, for example, you’re studying the following courses this semester: Marketing, Microeconomics, Stats and Organizational Behavior. When creating your free-form notes, you decide to assign your notebook the name, Semester 1. Then, you assign the names of your courses to each section (e.g. Section 1: Marketing; Section 2: Microeconomics; etc.). 

In your Microeconomics section, you create a folder containing all lectures—like Lecture 1: Supply and Demand, Lecture 2: Consumer Behavior and so on (you can add as many folders as you’d like in each notebook). You do the same for your three other courses, giving you a great overview of the topics in a structured way. 

Structure your notes any way you want directly in the Lix app and keep them open while you read your book.

The ability to have your textbook and notes open at the same time in your Lix app, while listening to your professor drone on and on during class, gives you increased learning ammo. How great is that?

So Much More Than Just Text

Your notes can include so much more than just text. You can insert images, links, media and tables. This way, you can customize your notes and personalize your learning. So the next time you find a hilarious meme a great Microeconomics video on Supply and Demand, insert it directly in your Lecture 1 note. It’s as easy as 1-2-3.

Search Across All Notes

Similar to using the Search function in your digital textbooks, Lix also supports searching for keywords and phrases in your free-form notes. When you need that specific Stats formula to ace your exam, you can quickly find it in the Lix app.    

Take Notes (Comments) Inside Your Textbooks Too

And don’t worry, you can still take notes inside your textbooks—but we’ve renamed it ‘Comments’ because calling everything ‘Notes’ got a bit confusing. This way, you can still add comments to your highlights and keep your thoughts closely related to your books, making it easy to find the exact info you need in crunch time.

Final Thoughts

Notes is just one of many upcoming features from Lix, but a particularly special one, especially if you want a life outside of school. With Lix’s Notes, you’ll be able to stay organized and structured, or at least have the option to. And all this newfound organization and structure is definitely gonna free up some serious time in your already packed schedule.


Speaking of time. Time is of the essence. Act now and subscribe with Lix. Try out things like Notes, Universal Search, Translate and more.

Currently, Notes is being beta-tested. Although we’re still working on the last few details, we’re excited for students like you to test it out. But you might run into a few issues along the way. If so, write to us at support@lix.com or leave us a comment below.

Kristy is a copywriter and former student at Columbia University. Having lived in New York City, Berlin and Auckland, she's a bit of a nomad, but has found a home away from home (wherever that is) in Copenhagen. When she's not busy writing on everything 'study-related,' she can be found in vintage shops and coffee parlors all around Copenhagen.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: